Archive for the ‘Acapulco’ Category

posted by colin on Apr 15

Most U.S. residents gave up on once­-famed Acapulco Bay as a vacation destination a long time ago. They ceded it to the Mexico City millions, who helped make it a big city on the beach.

 

But now there is a new reason to come back.

 

It’s the “new” Acapulco conveniently located about 10 miles southeast of Acapulco Bay.  Also conveniently, the international airport borders it.  Called Acapulco Diamante, it began about 15 years ago as mostly luxury homes and $250,000-and­ up condos for Mexico’s ultra-rich.

 

Peasant farmers and fishermen were bought out from the lush area, which features the open Pa­cific Ocean with mild-to-surfable waves on one side and a massive lagoon on the other. Three golf courses were constructed just off the beach.

 

The mid-1990s economic crisis froze much of the development today, however, its wind-swept beaches and miles of lightly popu­lated oceanfront have enough ho­tels (eight) and enough services to offer variety and competitive rates.

 

Acapulco Diamante (“dia­mond”) is practically eco-tourism. You can run alone on the beach or take a truly romantic walk at sun­set. There is no fast food – yet ­and only a few mini-marts.

Diamante’s newest hotel, The Grand Mayan , offers a sprawling, open-air island of good taste and plenty to do. A pool that’s more like a river runs through the place,as does a lagoon. It joins its slightly, older sibling, the Mayan Palace, and the two hotels share many of the same services, which include two water parks.

 

Nearby, Mayan Palace Resorts also has a mostly time-share property, Sea Garden, that offers rooms just off the beach. The pool is across the street, practically on the sand. It’s a superb hangout.

 

 

posted by colin on Aug 27

The Comeback Kid

Acapulco has had its ups and downs, but it keeps reinventing itself. Its er­ratic evolution-from glittering “celebrity central” in the ’50s and ’60s to a faded C ­list town in later decades-ended in the late 1990s, when its rebirth began. Accord­ing to Radilla Calderon, the development of other tourism destinations in Mexico­ and indeed, around the world-required that Acapulco remain “cutting-edge.”

 

As a result, there have been record-break­ing investments in the tourism infrastructure over the last few years, boasting the re­modeling and renovation of existing hotels in Acapulco, new condominium develop­ments, hotel and spa openings, and more. Acapulco has also become the selected site for a multitude of international conventions, movie festivals and sport tournaments.

“The city’s continued growth and transformation is high­lighted in Acapulco’s Diaman­te area as well as in projects in locations throughout. First off is Mundo Imperial, an ambi­tious development comprised of the Casa Imperial hotel, which will feature 800 de­luxe guestrooms and suites; 501 Imperial, a spa focused on traditional Chinese wellness therapies; Foro Imperial, a 4,OOO-seat theater; a meetings and conven­tion center named Expo Imperial, which will have the largest ballroom in all of Mexico; and the Paseo Imperial cultural corridor. “Set to open in the spring of 2008, this mega­complex will establish an unprecedented level of luxury and excellence in business, hospitality and entertainment in Acapulco” explains Radilla Calderon.

 

Goodman Hospitality Investments recent­ly acquired two of Acapulco’s most famous properties, The Fairmont Acapulco Prin­cess and The Fairmont Pierre Marques, though Fairmont Hotels & Resorts will still manage them. Goodman is set to invest $50 million in a renovation of guestrooms, ex­pansion of the Willow Stream Spa and addi­tion of a multi-functional conference center, as well as the redevelopment of its two golf courses and the construction of a golf and beach club.

 

As for the future, Radilla Calderon is cer­tain that the ongoing improvements to tour­ism infrastructure and highways will allow Acapulco to continue to be “Mexico’s most revered resort destination for many years to come. The Mexican government remains committed to building upon Acapulco’s iconic appeal and it is expected that within the next two years, development will begin of a new ‘Tourism Corridor’ that will traverse the coastal region between the important resort destinations of Acapulco and Ixtapa ­Zihuatanejo, further enhancing our appeal and accessibility.”

 

posted by colin on Jun 10

 Acapulco, Mexico Vacation

Acapulco Diamante Enlivens Acapulco Tourism

Most U.S. residents gave up on once-famed Acapulco Bay as a vacation destination a long time ago. They ceded it to the Mexico City millions of people, who helped make it a big city on the beach.

But now there is a new reason to come back.

It’s the “new” Acapulco conveniently located about 10 miles southeast of Acapulco Bay. Also conveniently, the international airport borders it. Called Acapulco Diamante, it began about 15 years ago as mostly luxury homes and $250,000-and up condos for Mexico’s ultra-rich.

Peasant farmers and fishermen were bought out from the lush area, which features the open Pacific Ocean with mild-to-surfable waves on one side and a massive lagoon on the other. Three golf courses were constructed just off the beach.

The mid-1990s economic crisis froze much of the development today, however, its wind-swept beaches and miles of lightly populated oceanfront have enough hotels (eight) and enough services to offer variety and competitive rates.

Acapulco Diamante (“diamond”) is practically eco-tourism. You can run alone on the beach or take a truly romantic walk at sunset. There is no fast food – yet and only a few mini-marts.

Diamante’s newest hotel, the Grand Mayan Acapulco, offers a sprawling, open-air island of good taste and plenty to do. A pool that’s more like a river runs through the resort,as does a lagoon. It joins its slightly, older sibling, the Mayan Palace Acapulco, and the two hotels share many of the same services, which include two water parks.

At night, there are bars and a nightclub. The Grand Mayan’s rooms, especially the suites, are modem, airy and hip. The Jacuzzi is in the bedroom. Your personal mini-pool is on the sun deck (in the suites). Views are spectacular. A regular room can I run $300 a night (depending on the time of year) , and suites go for $425 but can hold as many as six people.

Nearby, the Mayan also has a mostly time-share property, Mayan Sea Garden Acapulco, that offers rooms just off the beach. The pool is across the street, practically on the sand. It’s a superb hangout.

The Fairmont hotels, the Princess and the Pierre Marques, have shared a big chunk of beach near the popular Revolcadero surfing spot for 30 over years. 0f course Diamante as a distinct area it did not yet exist. They are just two hotels far from everything.

The Princess is the nicer of the two. Built like a pyramid, it looks just a few years old. Both hotels regularly have conventions. But the Princess is a Diamante tradition, with great food, great service and a great beach.

Both the Mayanand the Fairmont properties are big.  But Diamante also offers a near-boutique hotel (74 rooms) that sits on a cliff above Revolcadero Beach. Acapulco with its blazing water scooters, beach vendors and raging night life is just a short taxi trip away.

At the Quinta Real, rooms are spacious, with all the amenities one can expect for $400 a night. A full spa offers mud baths, massage and a variety of skin treatments and ways to relax.

Another Diamante hotel is actually on a tidy little bay: Puerto Marquez, between the open ocean and Acapulco beach The Camino Real offers a private beach, extensive water sports and luxury rooms. It often offers great deals.

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